Social Media and Academics

I was lucky enough to get to write a short piece for the Guardian Higher education section on working as an anonymous academic online - which you can read here:  However, there were things which didn't make the edit, so I've posted below the original unedited version.    For many academics it may seem that the rise … Continue reading Social Media and Academics

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There Is Nothing In The Dark To Be Afraid Of

Horror Studies has in the past few decades become increasingly interested in philosophy. The objects of fear that horror produced were not merely a low brow mode of aesthetic expression but a means of understanding the darker sides of thought in a particular socio-cultural or historical moment. Texts like Dracula (1898) were not merely about … Continue reading There Is Nothing In The Dark To Be Afraid Of

A Machine For Thinking The Unthinkable: H.P Lovecraft and Karl Barth’s Das Nichtige

To talk of a theological Lovecraft may initially strike the aficionado of weird fiction as an exercise in futility. In his personal writing, Lovecraft reveals a deeply held atheism and critical work has always acknowledged what S.T Joshi refers to as his cynical materialism. Lovecraft himself opined in 1919 that ‘there is a real restfulness … Continue reading A Machine For Thinking The Unthinkable: H.P Lovecraft and Karl Barth’s Das Nichtige

REVIEW: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power

Max Haiven: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power Zed Books, London & New York 2014, 320pp, £14.95 pb To talk of values in modern political discourse seems to entail being confronted with the uncomfortable and seemingly unstoppable infiltration of capitalist economic language into the fields of morality and the ethical. Economic value it would seem … Continue reading REVIEW: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power

REVIEW: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace

Nolen Gertz: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace Palgrave-Macmillan, London, 2014. 218 pp $87.39 hb Conflict, many would argue, is intrinsic to the relational nature of humanity and as such is a vital topic for philosophical thinking. From the Indian epic of the Mahabharata and … Continue reading REVIEW: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace

What You Need to Know About Structuralism – Or, Learning to Read Again

The idea of reading is often explicated in terms of its utility, which for a skill that many of us possess and is generally considered a sign of one of the vague concepts like “civilization” is more than a little strange when you stop to think about it too long. You need to learn to … Continue reading What You Need to Know About Structuralism – Or, Learning to Read Again

Reframing The Monster: Politics/Ethics/Discourse

Monster (der) Latin: monstrum – to warn. To show. What does it mean to be a monster? In the era of postmodernity, where the notion of normativity has been systematically subjected to that Lyotardian scepticism that has permeated many of the old certainties, how do we approach the figure of the monstrous Other? Throughout culture … Continue reading Reframing The Monster: Politics/Ethics/Discourse