REVIEW: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power

Max Haiven: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power Zed Books, London & New York 2014, 320pp, £14.95 pb To talk of values in modern political discourse seems to entail being confronted with the uncomfortable and seemingly unstoppable infiltration of capitalist economic language into the fields of morality and the ethical. Economic value it would seem … Continue reading REVIEW: Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power

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REVIEW: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace

Nolen Gertz: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace Palgrave-Macmillan, London, 2014. 218 pp $87.39 hb Conflict, many would argue, is intrinsic to the relational nature of humanity and as such is a vital topic for philosophical thinking. From the Indian epic of the Mahabharata and … Continue reading REVIEW: The Philosophy of War and Exile: From the Humanity of War to the Inhumanity of Peace

What You Need to Know About Structuralism – Or, Learning to Read Again

The idea of reading is often explicated in terms of its utility, which for a skill that many of us possess and is generally considered a sign of one of the vague concepts like “civilization” is more than a little strange when you stop to think about it too long. You need to learn to … Continue reading What You Need to Know About Structuralism – Or, Learning to Read Again

REVIEW: “Culture and the Death of God” by Terry Eagleton

Terry Eagleton made his name in British criticism as the principal (and often only) high-profile revolutionary socialist in literary scholarship. However, as postmodernity exerted its toll upon the intellectual theorist, Eagleton seemed increasingly dissatisfied with the scope and method of much postmodern theory, declaring back in 2004 with his book After Theory that much critical … Continue reading REVIEW: “Culture and the Death of God” by Terry Eagleton

REVIEW: “Against Austerity” by Richard Seymour

Against Austerity, How We can Fix the Crisis They Made by Richard Seymour, (London, Pluto Press, 2014) Some political and social constructs seem to come ready-made with an air of permanence about them – dropping into public and political discourse with a veneer of doughty solidity. Of course, it is the impression of solidity that … Continue reading REVIEW: “Against Austerity” by Richard Seymour

Subject Formation In Alasdair Gray

After focusing on Scottish literature over on the Twitter's a few weeks back I found one of the recurring theme was the notion of how Scottish identity was formed. That in turn collided with me re-reading Alasdair Gray's fantastic political, fantasy novel 'Poor Things.' Here are the thoughts that followed...   On first reading it … Continue reading Subject Formation In Alasdair Gray